What’s the Point?

By: Phil Ortiz
www.collegelifeplanning.com

What’s the Point?

What do I like to do? What would I be good at? How do I even know if I will like what I do? What about college? Should I even go? I don’t even know what i’m going to major in. Would I be wasting money? Maybe i’ll just figure it out when I get there. How am I going to pay for college? Should I just take out loans? What if I don’t like the classes? What if I don’t like the college? How do I know what college is right for me? What am I going to do after I graduate? How am I going to pay off my loans? How do I even know what I would be good at? All my friends are going to this college, maybe I should go…if they like it then I might… My family went to that college, I should just go to the same one. There is no way I could go to college, I could never afford it.

Sounds pretty hectic, but that is exactly what is going on in students heads while in high school and right after they graduate. The facts are that these questions are so difficult to answer and students are so far off from anything they can call an answer that they don’t even think about trying to find an answer. So on the outside it looks as though they don’t care, but in reality, they do, they just don’t have the tools to answer these questions.

Deep within every student there is an immeasurable amount of potential to succeed. Yet that will never be unleashed unless the student knows where and how to apply that potential.  Every student coming out of high school was born with strengths.  Every student, your son or daughter,  or even you holding this book, were defined and wired for a specific purpose. But what is that purpose? What are these “things”? What are these “strengths”? How do I tap in this potential? Are you sure I actually have strengths? Yes, absolutely everyone has strengths. Our strengths were not given to us simply to achieve our own goals. Our strengths were given so we can fulfill God’s purpose and plan for our lives and bring His Kingdom. This is the concept of vocation, or calling. “A job is what you are hired to do, a calling is what you are wired to do.”

What students first need is for someone to “draw out” these inner talents, strengths and gifts then they can be “poured” into with personalized, focused and applicable education according to their strengths.  The object of students in high school is to identify these strengths then develop, cultivate and test these strengths in college.  Once you better understand and appreciate your personal strengths, you can get a clearer focus on your identity with a more specific direction for your future.  This will create a mindset that will not make work seem like an actual task. When you sit down to start a project, or a paper, it won’t feel like a burden, hanging over your head like those fill in the blank worksheets, research papers, or boring reading assignments about topics you don’t understand and subjects you don’t really care about.  You will begin to study subjects that excite your mind and will instigate your desire to learn.

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About Nathan and Joanna Cornett

We are a from San Diego California, currently on a mission trip in Guatemala. Nathan has worked as a youth pastor, teen center director, college advisor, and now missionary. Joanna has worked at LaBahn's Landscape for 7 years in the field, sales, and as the Vice President, she started the Hispanic ministry at Foothills Church, and has worked in youth ministry, she is now working as a missionary. We are both passionate about youth, worship, and missions.

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